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Depression - overview

Blues; Gloom; Sadness; Melancholy

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Depression may be described as feeling sad, blue, unhappy, miserable, or down in the dumps. Most of us feel this way at one time or another for short periods.

Clinical depression is a mood disorder in which feelings of sadness, loss, anger, or frustration interfere with everyday life for weeks or more.

Depression Myths and Facts

  • Which of these may be a symptom of depression?

     

    A. Feeling, sad, worthless, or guilty

     

    B. Fatigue

     

    C. Loss of pleasure

     

    D. Problems doing tasks at home or work

     

    E. Change of appetite

     

    F. All of the above

    Correct Answer
  • Depression is a state of mind – if you try hard enough, you can snap out of it.

     

    A. Myth

     

    B. Fact

    Correct Answer
  • If a friend or loved one talks about suicide, what should you do?

     

    A. Don't be alarmed – suicide is rare

     

    B. Seek professional help immediately

     

    C. Check back tomorrow to see if the person is feeling better

    Correct Answer
  • Depression is more common in women.

     

    A. Myth

     

    B. Fact

    Correct Answer
  • People who are depressed tend to:

     

    A. Eat more than usual

     

    B. Eat less than usual

     

    C. Either A or B

    Correct Answer
  • Children don't get depressed.

     

    A. Myth

     

    B. Fact

    Correct Answer
  • Men may spend more time at work when they are depressed.

     

    A. Myth

     

    B. Fact

    Correct Answer
  • Which types of talk therapy are effective in treating depression?

     

    A. Support groups

     

    B. Psychotherapy

     

    C. Cognitive-behavioral therapy

     

    D. All of the above

    Correct Answer
  • Depression can make the symptoms of other illnesses seem worse.

     

    A. Myth

     

    B. Fact

    Correct Answer
  • Which of the following is true of antidepressant medicines?

     

    A. Antidepressants usually start working right away.

     

    B. Antidepressants are addictive.

     

    C. If one type of antidepressant doesn't help, chances are another one will

     

    D. You will probably need to take antidepressants for the rest of your life

    Correct Answer
  • Depression is very difficult to treat.

     

    A. Myth

     

    B. Fact

    Correct Answer

Considerations

Depression can occur in people of all ages:

Symptoms of depression include:

  • Low mood or irritable mood most of the time
  • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
  • A big change in appetite, often with weight gain or loss
  • Tiredness and lack of energy
  • Feelings of worthlessness, self-hate, and guilt
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Slow or fast movements
  • Lack of activity and avoiding usual activities
  • Feeling hopeless or helpless
  • Repeated thoughts of death or suicide
  • Lack of pleasure in activities you usually enjoy, including sex

Remember that children may have different symptoms than adults. Watch for changes in schoolwork, sleep, and behavior. If you wonder whether your child might be depressed, talk with your health care provider. Your provider can help you learn how to help your child with depression.

The main types of depression include:

  • Major depression. It occurs when feelings of sadness, loss, anger, or frustration interfere with daily life for weeks or longer periods of time.
  • Persistent depressive disorder. This is a depressed mood that lasts 2 years. Over that length of time, you may have periods of major depression, with times when your symptoms are milder.

Other common forms of depression include:

  • Postpartum depression. Many women feel somewhat down after having a baby. However, true postpartum depression is more severe and includes the symptoms of major depression.
  • Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Symptoms of depression occur 1 week before your period and disappear after you menstruate.
  • Seasonal affective disorder (SAD). This occurs most often during fall and winter, and disappears during spring and summer. It is most likely due to a lack of sunlight.
  • Major depression with psychotic features. This occurs when a person has depression and loss of touch with reality (psychosis).

Bipolar disorder occurs when depression alternates with mania (formerly called manic depression). Bipolar disorder has depression as one of its symptoms, but it is a different type of mental illness.

Causes

Depression often runs in families. This may be due to your genes, behaviors you learn at home, or your environment. Depression may be triggered by stressful or unhappy life events. Often, it is a combination of these things.

Many factors can bring on depression, including:

  • Alcohol or drug abuse
  • Medical conditions, such as cancer or long-term (chronic) pain
  • Stressful life events, such as job loss, divorce, or death of a spouse or other family member
  • Social isolation (a common cause of depression in older adults)
 

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call 911, a suicide hotline, or go to a nearby emergency room if you have thoughts of hurting yourself or others.

Call your provider if:

  • You hear voices that are not there.
  • You cry often without cause.
  • Your depression has affected your work, school, or family life for longer than 2 weeks.
  • You have three or more symptoms of depression.
  • You think one of your current medicines may be making you feel depressed. DO NOT change or stop taking any medicines without talking to your provider.
  • If you think your child or teen may be depressed.

You should also call your provider if:

  • You think you should cut back on drinking alcohol
  • A family member or friend has asked you to cut back on drinking alcohol
  • You feel guilty about the amount of alcohol you drink
  • You drink alcohol first thing in the morning

References

American Psychiatric Association. Depressive disorders. In: American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013:155-188.

American Psychiatric Association website. Practice guideline for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. psychiatryonline.org/pb/assets/raw/sitewide/practice_guidelines/guidelines/mdd.pdf. Updated October 31, 2015. Accessed June 1, 2018.

Fava M, Ostergaard SD, Cassano P. Mood disorders: depressive disorders (major depressive disorder). In: Stern TA, Fava M, Wilens TE, Rosenbaum JF, eds. Massachusetts General Hospital Comprehensive Clinical Psychiatry. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 29.

Walter HJ, Bogdanovic N, Moseley LR, DeMaso DR. Mood disorders. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 26.

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Review Date: 5/5/2018

Reviewed By: Fred K. Berger, MD, addiction and forensic psychiatrist, Scripps Memorial Hospital, La Jolla, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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