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Hepatic vein obstruction (Budd-Chiari)

Budd-Chiari syndrome; Hepatic veno-occlusive disease

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Hepatic vein obstruction is a blockage of the hepatic vein, which carries blood away from the liver.

Causes

Hepatic vein obstruction prevents blood from flowing out of the liver and back to the heart. This blockage can cause liver damage. Obstruction of this vein can be caused by a tumor or growth pressing on the vessel, or by a clot in the vessel (hepatic vein thrombosis).

Most often, it is caused by conditions that make blood clots more likely to form, including:

  • Abnormal growth of cells in the bone marrow (myeloproliferative disorders)
  • Cancers
  • Chronic inflammatory or autoimmune diseases
  • Infections
  • Inherited (hereditary) or acquired problems with blood clotting
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Pregnancy

Hepatic vein blockage is the most common cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome.

Symptoms

Symptoms include:

  • Abdominal swelling or stretching
  • Pain in the right upper abdomen
  • Vomiting blood
  • Yellowing of the skin (jaundice)

Exams and Tests

One of the signs is swelling of the abdomen from fluid buildup (ascites). The liver is often swollen and tender.

Tests include:

Treatment

Treatment varies, depending on the cause of the blockage.

Your health care provider may recommend the following medicines:

  • Blood thinners (anticoagulants)
  • Clot-busting drugs (thrombolytic treatment)
  • Medicines to treat the liver disease, including ascites

Surgery may be recommended. This may involve:

Possible Complications

Hepatic vein obstruction can get worse and lead to liver failure, which can be life threatening.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if:

  • You have symptoms of hepatic vein obstruction
  • You are being treated for this condition and you develop new symptoms

References

Hauser SC. Vascular diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 143.

Valla DC. Vascular disease of the liver. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 85.

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  • Digestive system

    Digestive system

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  • Digestive system organs

    Digestive system organs

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  • Blood clot formation

    Blood clot formation

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  • Blood clots

    Blood clots

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    • Digestive system

      Digestive system

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    • Digestive system organs

      Digestive system organs

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    • Blood clot formation

      Blood clot formation

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    • Blood clots

      Blood clots

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    Review Date: 5/11/2016

    Reviewed By: Subodh K. Lal, MD, gastroenterologist with Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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